Vulnerability score for adolescents and young adults attending secondary care

Lead Supervisor
Dr Ingrid Wolfe
Reader in Paediatrics and Child Health
Women and Children’s Health, SoLCPHS
King’s College London
ingrid.wolfe@kcl.ac.uk

Co-supervisor
Dr Julia Forman

Project Details

This project aims to develop a composite vulnerability score for use in primary care that can identify factors which predict hospital admission for adolescents and young adults aged 16-25y. It is well recognised that adolescence/young adulthood (AYA) is a discrete life stage, distinct from childhood and adulthood, characterised by adolescent-specific health problems and health outcomes. Healthcare services, however, are designed either around children or adults, without specific pathways for adolescents. Furthermore, health care data is often aggregated towards children or adults, with health outcomes in adolescents being conflated with those of children. As data are not collected about AYA as a cohort, services cannot be tailored to offer preventive interventions, in the same way as they are to the over 50s.

OpenSafely is an open source, highly secure informatics platform storing primary care data on 24 million people in England, linked to hospital admission and emergency department attendances. Data is pseudonymised and held within a secure datacentre accessible only through a proxy. As the data are linked to sustainability and transformation plan (STP) regions, it will be possible to analyse outcomes in the context of regional socioeconomic factors using linked datasets.

These data can be used to identify factors (medical, socioeconomic and environmental) which are associated with hospital admission in AYA. The intention is to use these factors to develop a composite vulnerability score for use in primary care or emergency departments that might allow upstream interventions to pre-empt or prevent hospital admission.

Datasets

OpenSafely is an open source, highly secure informatics platform storing primary care data on 24 million people in England, linked to hospital admission and emergency department attendances. Data is pseudonymised and held within a secure datacentre accessible only through a proxy.

Keywords

Child, adolescence, vulnerable, predictive model